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Captain Ali told us how a young man had only just become a father when he was sent to the front line to defend his homeland. Like so many others, that young man never returned from the Gallipoli Peninsular. He never got to see his son grow up; he never got to see his grandson become a submarine captain.

No one spoke as we looked at the exhibits in the museum. Old uniforms hung on the wall; rusted tools and weapons were displayed in cabinets around the room. Amongst the memorabilia were photos of proud young men, standing to attention in their crisply ironed khakis. Their eyes were full of life and adventure to come.

For twelve thousand Australian and New Zealand men, the Gallipoli Peninsular is where the adventure would end.  

While driving down to ANZAC Cove, we passed a flat area of grass several metres inland from the coastline. This circular area surrounded by small ridges on its boundaries became known as "Shell Green" where many cricket tests between Australian and New Zealand troops took place. The Turkish soldiers didn't know what to make of this funny game involving a ball and a stick! They found it particularly amusing when the soldiers would argue with each other so much that fights would erupt.

Bruce wondered who got the ball if someone hit a six?


Go to this site and scroll down a little to see how many people from other countries were killed or wounded at Gallipoli
Catch a glimpse of Shell Green


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